Tag Archives: Violet Addison

The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper Stories edited by Maxim Jakubowski

Overview
Image result for the mammoth book of jack the ripper stories book cover

Title: The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper Stories
Author: Maxim Jakubowski, Barbara Nadel, Rhys Hughes, Columbkill Noonan, John Moralee, Martin Edwards, Paul A. Freeman, Vanessa de Sade, Josh Reynolds, M. Christian, Terry Davis, Patrick Jones, Michael Gregorio, Alex Howard, Stephen Dedman, Sarah Morrison, Martin Gately, Andrew Lane, Nic Martin, K.G. Anderson, Violet Addison, David N. Smith, Keith Moray, William Meikle, Cara Cooper, Brett McBean, Andrew Darlington, Betsy van Die, David Bishop, Nick Sweet, Steve Rasnic Tem, Erin N. Kennemer, Adrian Ludens, Catherine Lundoff, Martin Feekins, C.L. Raven, Nicky Peacock, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, Sally Spedding & Adrian Cole
Series: Mammoth Books
In: The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper Stories (Maxim Jakubowski)
Rating Out of 5: 3.5 (Liked this)
My Bookshelves: Crime, Historical fictionShort story collections, Thriller
Dates read: 29th January – 30th December 2019
Pace: Slow
Format: Anthology
Publisher: Robinson
Year: 2015
5th sentence, 74th page: She does not possess the sharpest mind, and it was not until long after the death of her friend Mary Jane that she began to make sense of what had happened.

Synopsis

Jack the Ripper as he has never been seen before…

Countless theories have been put forward by Ripperologists as to the identity of the notorious Victorian serial killer, but in the absence of proof how can we hope ever to unearth his real identity? How many more plausible new theories based on known facts can the experts hope to come up with?

In this wonderful collection of newly commissioned stories, Jakubowski has compiled an extraordinary array of fresh explorations into the identity and activities of Jack the Ripper – this time unabashedly fictional, unrestrained by the facts of the case. Contributors include Vaanessa de Sade, Sarah Morrison, Betsy van Die, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro and Sally Spedding.

Cummulatively, they propose numerous possible identities, some already suggested by historians, others more speculative, including some famous names from history and fiction – even Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson are on the case!

Thoughts

You know from the very beginning that this collection is going to be quite twisted. I mean, it’s a collection of 40 stories about Jack the Ripper. That is never going to be a nice collection. But it was an incredibly interesting one. One that I’m incredibly glad I read and found very difficult to put down.

I’m glad that I read The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper before reading this. It made a few things make a little more sense as I read these short stories. Plus, there were SO many different takes on the events of 1888. Or adaptations to modern day society. It filled my head with a lot of wonderful information.

After reading this, I know even more about Jack the Ripper. I’m not actually sure that this is such a good thing. Because wow. There’s a reason why he’s (or maybe she’s) such a notorious killer. There are just so many things that are known and not known…

<- The Mammoth Book of Jack the RipperBertie ->

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The Face of the Killer by Violet Addison and David N. Smith

Overview
Image result for the mammoth book of jack the ripper stories book cover

Title: The Face of the Killer
Author: Violet Addison & David N. Smith
In: The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper Stories (Maxim Jakubowski)
Rating Out of 5: 3 (On the fence about this one)
My Bookshelves: Crime, Historical fiction, Race
Dates read: 25th August 2019
Pace: Slow
Format: Short story
Publisher: Robinson
Year: 2015
5th sentence, 74th page: On its back was a single wooden coffin, its sides stained with blood.

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Synopsis

He thinks he’s seen the face of the killer, and he’s determined to help find him. But could he have been mistaken? Did he really see the face of the killer?

Thoughts

This is the first story in the The Mammoth Book of Jack the Ripper Stories collection which deals with racism as an aspect of finding the killer. Although there was an obvious aggression towards Jews at the time, none of the tales in this collection have specifically addressed this topic. Which made this kind of amazing. After all, a tale of perceptions, understandings and inherent racism is always going to be a good kind of read.

This was a story that seemed to be about the “true” identity of the killer. About what he actually looked like, not about how easily misconceptions can occur. But I liked this angle much better. After all, we’ll never truly know who the Ripper was, and all we have to go on are reports based on others’ thoughts and perceptions.

My favourite part of this short story was the ending. The feeling of shame and guilt that the narrator felt when he realised that he let his prejudice destroy a good man’s life. And the moment when he realises that his actions had consequences, although he is not necessarily held responsible for them.

 <- His Last Victim ReviewA Head for Murder Review ->
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