Tag: Comedy

The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish

This might be the funniest, most ridiculous, and yet serious book I have read all year. Or maybe ever. It was intense, intriguing and made me have a whole new appreciation for some of the horrors that other people, and in particular, women are forced to endure. But there was also so much humour and hope, that it was incredibly difficult to get bogged down in the tales that, if anyone else wrote about them, would fill make me cry in the most horrible way ever.

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God Clown by Carol Emshwiller

I’ve sometimes wondered if the world is run by clowns. Or something similar. After all, nothing really makes sense, everything is random, and whoever in charge probably has a sick sense of humour. Very sick. Sadistic even. Which is why I like the idea of a story which is based on the idea of a God Clown.

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The Duke of Riverside by Ellen Kushner

The wit and dry humour in this story had me chuckling a fair bit. There was something about a strange, lanky scholar who was desperate to be killed roaming the streets and just having absolutely no luck. It got even better when you found out that he was a duke and abhorrent to the rest of his family. The beauty, humour and irony in the story had me cackling more than I should probably admit if I still wanted people to consider me sane (which I don’t, so it’s fine).

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The Twits by Roald Dahl

Growing up, my best friend and I decided that we were the “Twin Twits”. And I couldn’t for the life of me remember why and where this came from. Until I bought a box set of Roald Dahl books. And realised exactly why we used the word Twits. As an adult, I’m not entirely sure why we thought that was “cool”, but it meant that rereading this was a great, nostalgic journey down memory lane.

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How the Pooka Came to New York City by Delia Sherman

Most of the fae stories I read form some mentioning of the immigration of the Fair Folk to America in some way, shape or form. There’s always a mention of the industrial revolution and a discussion of how hard it was, even for these supernatural immigrants. But I’ve never read a story that actually takes place in this time. That talks about those first moments off the boat in a whole new world that is just as convoluted and confusing to the fae as it was to the humans. Until now. And I find that I kind of love it…

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Cat of the World by Michael Cadnum

Cats are tricky, difficult and irritating creatures. They always have been. They’re also kind of fun, but, mostly irritating and tricky. Which means that it makes perfect sense to have a feline creature in a collection of trickster stories. I also love that although it is a cat trickster with extra powers, it’s not quite god-like and not quite mortal… but a glorious, contrary mix of something in between.

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Laughing All the Way to the Mosque by Zarqa Nawaz

I’ve not really read much about Muslim culture and religion. I’ve really only recently started to delve into the world of non-fictional books. It’s an area that is absolutely fascinating and I can’t wait to continue to find more and more stories like this. Especially written as well as this novel. Nawaz is brutally honest about her life and her religion, but tempers everything that could feel quite serious with a lot of humour. I was constantly laughing out loud throughout this story. And at the end of every long day, I couldn’t wait to pick it back up again.

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Dead Hand by Sharyn McCrumb

I don’t follow cars. Or racing. And especially not NASCAR. I only really vaguely know anything about it to be honest. So reading a short story that had a horror component was kind of interesting. And a little disconcerting. And I didn’t entirely understand this short story…

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