Category Archives: Challenges

From Sea to Shining Sea – South Dakota

Duration: 1st January – 31st March 2021
Number of books: 10
Hosted by: Crazy Challenge Connection

From Sea to Shining Sea – South Dakota
Duration: Jan 01, 2021 – Feb 28, 2021

1. Both North Dakota and South Dakota became states on the same day, November 2, 1889, making them the 39th and 40th states of the United States. Pierre is South Dakota’s capital city. Its name comes from the Sioux word Dakota which means friends or allies. South Dakota is nicknamed the Mount Rushmore State after the world’s greatest mountain carving on South Dakota’s Black Hills.
Read a book whose title begins with a letter in DAKOTA (ignore a, an and the) -or- read a book where the protagonist makes new friends as the plot progresses -or- read a book with a recognizable monument on the cover (post the cover). – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

2. South Dakota is bordered by the states of North Dakota to the north, Minnesota to the east, Iowa to the southeast, Nebraska to the south, Wyoming to the west, and Montana to the northwest. The state is bisected by the Missouri River, dividing South Dakota into two geographically and socially distinct halves, known to residents as “East River” and “West River”. East River is home to most of the state’s population, and the area’s fertile soil is used to grow a variety of crops. West River is more closely associated with ranching, and the economy is more dependent on tourism and defense spending. Most of the Native American reservations are in West River.
✒ Read a book whose cover is divided into halves in some way (post the cover) -or- read a book in which the story is told in two perspectives -or- read a book with antonyms in the title.

3. South Dakota’s state animal is the coyote. The state bird is the ring-necked pheasant. Its state flower is the American pasqueflower. The state tree is the Black Hills spruce. The state sport is Rodeo and the state dessert is kuchen. South Dakota’s state motto is “Under God the People Rule”.
✒ Read a book in which religion is important -or- read a book whose cover is predominantly purple (post the cover) -or- read a book whose title or subtitle features a word not in the English language (tell us the language the word is from. For those reading a non-English language book, a word not in the language the book is in. Tell us the language of both the book and the word).

4. The Wounded Knee Massacre was a domestic massacre of nearly three hundred Lakota people, by soldiers of the United States Army. It occurred on December 29, 1890, near Wounded Knee Creek on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, following a botched attempt to disarm the Lakota camp. On the morning of December 29, the U.S. Cavalry troops went into the camp to disarm the Lakota. One version of events claims that during the process of disarming the Lakota, a deaf tribesman named Black Coyote was reluctant to give up his rifle, claiming he had paid a lot for it. Black Coyote’s rifle went off at that point, and the U.S. Army began shooting at the Native Americans. The Lakota warriors fought back, but many had already been stripped of their guns and disarmed. By the time the massacre was over, more than 250 men, women, and children of the Lakota had been killed and 51 were wounded (4 men and 47 women and children, some of whom died later). Some estimates placed the number of dead as high as 300. In 1990, both houses of the U.S. Congress passed a resolution on the historical centennial formally expressing deep regret for the massacre. The Wounded Knee Battlefield has been designated a National Historic Landmark.
✒ Read a book in which a massacre occurs -or- read a book written by a Native American author (provide a link to the author’s GR page) -or- read a book in which something or someone in memorialized (tell us how your book fits).

5. Mount Rushmore National Memorial is centered on a colossal sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills in Keystone, South Dakota. Sculptor Gutzon Borglum created the sculpture’s design and oversaw the project’s execution from 1927 to 1941 with the help of his son, Lincoln Borglum. The sculpture features the 60-foot heads of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The four presidents were chosen to represent the nation’s birth, growth, development, and preservation, respectively. South Dakota historian Doane Robinson is credited with conceiving the idea of carving the likenesses of noted figures into the mountains of the Black Hills of South Dakota in order to promote tourism in the region. While Doane Robinson wanted the carving to feature American West heroes (Lewis & Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody, Sacagawea, Crazy Horse etc.), Borglum believed that the sculpture should have broader appeal and chose the four presidents.
✒ Read a book featuring a president/prime minister/other democratically elected head of state as a character or a non fiction book about them -or- read a book whose cover shows a mountain top (post the cover) -or- read a book in which art (any medium) is important to the plot.

6. The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), or Sanford Lab, is an underground laboratory in Lead, South Dakota. The deepest underground laboratory in the United States, it houses multiple experiments in areas such as dark matter and neutrino physics research, biology, geology and engineering. SURF is located in the former Homestake Gold Mine, which was the largest and deepest gold mine in North America until it closed in 2002. The Homestake Mine was already famous in scientific circles when it was still a working gold mine, because an underground laboratory was set up there in the 1960s. This was the site where the solar neutrino problem (the discrepancy in the predicted and measured neutrinos from the sun) was first discovered in what is known as the Homestake Experiment.
✒ Read a book in which a scientific experiment of some sort in conducted -or- read a book in which a critical part of the plot occurs underground (tell us how the book fits) -or- read a book with a sun visible on the cover (post the cover).

7. South Dakota was once covered by a sea, and was home to three-toed horses, saber-toothed cats, dog-sized camels, and giant pig-like animals. Expeditions in and among the surreal pinnacles and gullies of South Dakota’s Badlands have uncovered fossils from at least 175 different species of Oligocene life, including the 23-million-year-old remains of rhinoceroses and tapirs. In fact, it is considered one of the world’s richest deposits of mammal fossil beds in the world. And in 1990, the most complete specimen of Tyrannosaurus Rex ever found was discovered in this part of the state. Today you’ll see bison and pronghorn and bighorn sheep roaming the Badlands, as well as an animal that nearly went extinct: the black-footed ferret, which survives today thanks to a captive breeding program and reintroduction to protected places like this.
✒ Read a book with a cat, dog, camel, horse or pig on the cover (post the cover) -or- read a book with an intact 23 in its number of pages (tell us the number of pages) -or- read a book in which something physical is unearthed (tell us how your book fits). – Kiss of Heat by Lora Leigh

8. Clark is home to the world famous Mashed Potato Wrestling Contest. Mitchell is the home of the world’s only Corn Palace, which is made of 3500 bushels of corn. Custer State Park has more than 1,300 free-roaming bison. The tradition of spreading sawdust on the floors of bars began in Deadwood as an effort to hide gold dust that would gather there. The Anne Hathaway Cottage at Wessington Springs is the only structure in the Midwest U.S. that still features a thatched roof. The Flaming Fountain on South Dakota State Capitol Lake is fed by an artesian well with natural gas content so high that it causes it to glow. Jewel Cave is the third-longest cave in the world with more than 120 miles of passages having been surveyed. Lemmon is the world’s largest petrified wood park, with fossilized remains of life from 50 million years old.
✒ Read book with a vegetable on the cover (post the cover) -or- read a book with a synonym of flame in the title (flame works also) -or- read the third book of a series (tell us the name).

9. The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is a motorcycle rally held annually in the Black Hills and in Sturgis. It was begun in 1938 by a group of Indian Motorcycle riders and was originally held for stunts and races. Attendance has historically been around 500,000 people, reaching a high of over 700,000 in 2015. The event takes place over 10 days and generates around $800 million in annual revenue. The Sturgis Rally has been held every year, with exceptions during World War II. For instance, from 1942 to 1944, the event was not held due to gasoline rationing.
✒ Read a book whose cover shows a motorcycle (post the cover) -or- read a book first published in 2015 -or- read a book whose series name begins with a letter in STURGIS (ignore a, an and the, tell us the series name).

10. It is illegal to fall asleep in a cheese factory in South Dakota. Every hotel must have twin beds two feet apart and love shall not be made between the beds. Mink dens cannot be disturbed. No throwing stars can be used in Sisseton. You cannot create static (!) in Huron. No horses are allowed in the Fountain Inn unless they’re wearing pants. It is illegal to try to convince a pacifist to renounce his beliefs by threatening to arm-wrestle him.
Read a book in which love was not made (sorry!) -or- read a book whose cover shows an arm (post the cover) -or- read a book with a pacifist character (tell us who). – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn (Cecilia)

CHALLENGE RULES – PLEASE READ!
See this thread for more detailed rules for CCC challenges.

❖ If you want to participate in a challenge, sign up by posting at least a partial list of the challenge requirements. This gives us a post to link you to, which you can use to update your books as the challenge progresses.

❖ Books must be at least 150 pages long (unless they are graphic novels, see below) and may only be used for one task in this challenge, but cross-challenge posting is encouraged.

❖ Graphic novels must be at least 300 pages long, but two books can be combined to make up the page count as long as they both meet the same criteria.

❖ For each book you read, please post a link to the title and mention the author and the date you finished reading it. If a challenge task gives several options, make it clear which option you’ve chosen. If the task calls for an item/color on the cover, include a link to the book cover.* If it’s not obvious from the book title or cover, be sure to explain how your book fits the task. If you don’t, you won’t get credit for completing that task.

❖ If you want the challenge moderator to verify those books as you post them, please copy/paste your update into a new message. If you do this while you still have the Edit window open, it will copy all of your formatting, etc. too. It will make it easier on the moderators if we won’t have to scroll back through the entire thread looking for “message #15,” or to follow links back to an original post.

❖ When you complete the challenge, please post your entire list as a new message to make it easier for everyone to see what you’ve read 🙂 If you don’t repost your list, your name will not be added to the list of those who have completed the challenge.

❖ Rereads are allowed, as long as you read the entire book and not just skim the best portions! 🙂

* If you don’t know how to post a link to the book title, cover or author, see the instructions HERE.

Braille Spell Challenge

Duration: 1st January – 31st January 2021
Number of books: 9
Hosted by: Crazy Challenge Connection

C – Rolling with the Punchlines by Urzila Carlson
O
O
KKiss of Heat by Lora Leigh
B – The Bride Test by Helen Hoang
O
O
K
S


January Spell- Braille

Duration: January 1- January 31, 2021

To go along with Connie’s scavenger challenge this month, choose one or more of these words to spell out in January. You may use the first letter of the first word in the book’s title (excluding A, An and The) OR the author’s first or last initial.(middle names or initials can NOT be used).

Braille Literacy Month
(Louis) Braille
(National) World Braille Day
blind
printed (word)
system
touch (reading)
raised dots
alphabet
left to right
contracts
regulations
insurance policies
directories
cookbooks
hobbies
(cultural) enrichment
music (scores)
hymnals
(playing) cards
board games
fingertips
(Charles) Barbier
night (writing)
communication
leather worker

CHALLENGE RULES:
See this thread for more detailed rules for all CCC challenges.

♦ If you want to participate in this challenge, please sign up by posting a challenge template including your word choice. This gives us a post to link you to, which you can use to update your books as the challenge progresses.

♦ Unless otherwise noted, books must be at least 150 pages long. (See the link above for rules regarding graphic novels.) Books may only be used for one task in this challenge, but cross-challenge posting is encouraged 🙂 Re-reads are allowed, as long as you read the entire book. You must read at least half of the book AFTER the challenge begins in order to count it for this challenge.

♦ You may use the first letter of the first word in the book’s title (excluding A, An and The) or the author’s first or last initial (middle names or initials can NOT be used).
-In the case of a hyphenated first or last name (i.e. Sarah-Kate LynchKate E. Dyer-Seeley), the first letter of the hyphenated name may be used (not the second initial directly following the hyphen).
-If an author uses what appears to be “two last names” (usually a female author using her maiden name and then her married last name; i.e. Kathy Hogan Trocheck), the last initial of the two names counts since the maiden name is now serving in the place of a “middle” name.

♦ For each book you read, please post a link to the title, and indicate the author and the date you finished reading it. If you don’t, you won’t get credit for completing that task.
* If you don’t know how to post a link to the book title or author, see the instructions here: Add a link to book title or author

♦ If you want the challenge moderator to verify your books as you post updates, please copy/paste your update into a new message . If you do this while you still have the Edit window open, it will copy all of your formatting, etc. too. We don’t have time to scroll back through the entire thread looking for “message #15,” or to follow links back to an original post.

♦ If you use books that are in a language other than English, please translate those titles into English for the purposes of this challenge, unless you plan to use that language for the entire challenge. If you do use another language for the whole challenge, please remember that the translations of exempt words/phrases — for example, A, An and The in this challenge — would be exempt as well.

♦ When you complete the challenge, please post your entire list as a new message. If you do this while you still have the Edit window open, it will copy all of your links and formatting. If you don’t repost your list, your name will not be added to the list of those who have completed the challenge.

Antarctica – Winter Spell Challenge

Duration: 1st January – 31st March 2021
Number of books: 13
Hosted by: Crazy Challenge Connection

G – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn
L – Kiss of Heat by Lora Leigh
A – Born Free by Joy Adamson
C – Rolling with the Punchlines by Urzila Carlson
I
O
L
O
G
I
S
T
S

WINTER 2020 SPELL CHALLENGE : ANTARCTICA, 12/21/20 – 3/20/21
As usual, we have a spelling challenge to go along with Chaitra’s Antarctica challenge. Choose one or more of the following words/phrases and spell them using the first letter of a book’s title (disregard A, An and The) OR the author’s first or last initial.

PLEASE NOTE :
* When using an author name to fill a spot, remember to post a link to the author’s GR page.
* Since this challenge is 3 months long, we ask that you choose words that add up to a minimum of 15 letters.

CHALLENGE RULES :
See this thread for more detailed rules for all CCC challenges.

♦ If you want to participate in this challenge, please sign up by posting the word/s you intend to spell. This gives us a post to link you to, which you can use to update your books as the challenge progresses. No link will be created for you until you post your choice/s.

♦ Unless otherwise noted, books must be at least 150 pages long. (See the link above for rules regarding graphic novels.) Books may only be used for one task in this challenge, but cross-challenge posting is encouraged 🙂 Re-reads are allowed, as long as you read the entire book. You must read at least half of the book AFTER the challenge begins in order to count it for this challenge.

♦ You may use the first letter of the first word in the book’s title (disregard A, An and The) or the author’s first or last initial (middle names or initials can NOT be used.). If you use an author name to fill a spot, remember to post a link to the author’s GR page.
* In the case of a hyphenated first or last name (i.e. Sarah-Kate LynchKate E. Dyer-Seeley, the first letter of the hyphenated name may be used (not the second initial directly following the hyphen).
* If an author uses what appears to be two last names, i.e. Kathy Hogan Trocheck), the last initial of the two names counts.
* For books by authors like Menna van Praag and Tatiana de Rosnay, use your library’s shelving method to determine whether to use the book for a V/P or D/R spot, but be sure to tell us how your library shelves those books.

♦ If you use books that are in a language other than English, please translate those titles into English (even if there is no English title here on GR) for the purposes of our challenges, unless you plan to use that language for the entire challenge. If you do use another language for the whole challenge, please remember that the translations of exempt words/phrases — for example, A, An and The — would be exempt as well.

♦ For each book you read, please post a link to the title, and indicate the author and the date you finished reading it. If you’re using the author’s name to fill a spot, remember to include a link to the author’s name as well.
    * If you don’t know how to post a link to the book title or author, see the instructions here: Add a link to the book title and/or author

♦ When you complete the challenge, please copy and paste your entire list as a new message at the end of the challenge thread. If you do this while you still have the Edit window open, it will copy all of your links and formatting. If you don’t repost your list, with appropriate links, your name will not be added to the list of those who have completed the challenge. Please do NOT simply post a link back to your original post.

THE WORDS/PHRASES
Adelie Penguins
Antarctic Convergence
Antarctic Ice Marathon
Antarctic Ice Sheet
Antarctic Seals
Antarctic Treaty
Antarctica
Axel Heiberg Glacier
Blood Falls
Canine Distemper
Carbon Dioxide
Chloroflourocarbons
Circumpolar Current
Climate Change
Deception Island
Dry Valleys
Emile Marco Palma
Emperor Penguins
Gamburtsev Mountains
Glaciologists
Greenhouse Gases
Katabatic Winds
King Haakon VII
Lake Vostok
Lava Lakes
McMurdo Station
Meteorites
Midnight Sun
Mount Erebus
Palmer Station
Polar Plateau
Polar Stratospheric Clouds
Polheim
Precipitation
Roald Amundsen
Robert Falcon Scott
South Pole
Southern Pole of Inaccessibility
Taylor Glacier
Transantarctic Range
Tropical Paradise
Vinson Massif
Vostok Station
West Wind Drift
Whiteout

Hit the Reset

Duration: 1st January – 31st January 2021
Number of books: 3
Hosted by: Bookworm Bitches

January 2021: Hit the Reset
Duration: 1/1/2021-1/31/2021

There are 3 tasks, you only need to read three books to finish this challenge. Or pick one task and read 3 books for that one task.

January
1. Read the oldest book on your shelves – Born Free by Joy Adamson (been on my shelf the longest)
2. Read the shortest book on your shelves
3. Read a book you meant to read in 2020 and didn’t get to. – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn

Rules
~Books must be read during the selected time period.
~Post the date you finished the book.
~All books read for challenges can be used for more than one challenge.
~Books can be either Fiction or Non Fiction. Your choice.
~At the end of the challenge, it will be closed for commenting and moved to the archives folder
~Use the add book/author tool to tag your book within your challenge.

Copy & paste the blank template below to begin your own challenge.

Supernatural Clue

Duration: 1st January – 31st March 2021
Number of books: 36
Hosted by: My Vampire Book Obsession

Duration
Jan 1st – Mar 31st 2021

Rules
Complete at least 10 Guesses to get the Vampire Heart
All Genres Welcome
No Minimum Page Count
One Book Per Task

🔍 Private Investigator (6 Items per category)
🔍 Police Detective (9 Items per category)
🔍 FBI Investigator (12 items per category)

description

description

1) Werewolf
Task: Read a book where the MC is a shifter
2) Vampire
Task: Read a book with a character who is a vampire
3) Fae
Task: Read a book with a character who is Fae
4) Dragon
Task: Read a book with something that can fly on the cover
5) Ghost
Task: Read a book where a character can see/talk to ghosts
6) Angel
Task: Read a book where a character can fly
7) Demon
Task: Read a book with a character who is a demon
8) Ghoul
Task: Read a book with an undead character
9) Phoenix
Task: Read a book whose title starts with the letter “P”
10) Witch
Task: Read a book with an MPG of Magic – Beautiful Beast by E.J. Hill
11) Goblin
Task: Read a book whose title starts with the letter “G” – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn
12) Unicorn
Task: Read a book with a four legged animal on the cover – Born Free by Joy Adamson

description

description


1) Sword
Task: Read a book with a sword on the cover
2) Knife
Task: Read a book where a character is stabbed
3) Crossbow
Task: Read a book where a character uses a cross bow or a bow and arrow
4) Fangs
Task: Read a book where a character bites another
5) Claws
Task: Read a book with the letters of CLAWS in the title
6) Battle Ax
Task: Read a book with a two word title
7) War Hammer
Task: Read a book that is tagged war on the first page of tags
8) Gun
Task: Read a book with a gun on the cover
9) Grenade
Task: Read a book with an explosion in the book
10) Spell
Task: Read a book where the MC can use magic
11) Venom
Task: Read a book where a character is poisoned or with the word poison in the title
12) Flame Thrower
Task: Read a book with fire on the cover

description

description


1) Castle
Task: Read a book with a large building on the cover
2) Swamp Shack
Task: Read a book where the MC is poor – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy
3) Mountain Cave
Task: Read a book with a mountain on the cover
4) Cottage
Task: Read a book whose title starts with the letter “C”
5) Cabin
Task: Read a book where a character stays in a cabin
6) Lake Chateau
Task: Read a book with a body of water on the cover
7) Tree House
Task: Read a book with a tree on the cover
8) Yurt
Task: Read a book with a one word title
9) Bungalow
Task: Read a book that is between 100 and 150 pages
10) Mobile Home
Task: Read a book where a character moves to a new location – Rolling with the Punchlines by Urzila Carlson
11) Palace
Task: Read a book where the MC is a King/Queen/Princess/Prince
12) Igloo
Task: Read a book with snow or ice on the cover

Antarctica – Winter Scavenger Challenge

Duration: 1st January – 31st March 2021
Number of books: 26
Hosted by: Crazy Challenge Connection

Winter 2020 Scavenger Challenge – Antarctica
Duration: Jan 01 2021 – Mar 31, 2021

If this was any year but 2020, now is the time you’d book your tickets on a cruise line to see penguins in Antarctica. But since it is 2020, you get this challenge instead.

This challenge consists of 26 random facts about Antarctica (mostly included because I got fascinated by them as I researched for this challenge). Choose any 16 and do the task associated with them. You do not have to choose before you start. And you can do all of them if you want.

CHALLENGE RULES – PLEASE READ!
See this thread for more detailed rules for CCC challenges.

❖ If you want to participate in a challenge, sign up by posting at least a partial list of the challenge requirements. This gives us a post to link you to, which you can use to update your books as the challenge progresses.

❖ Books must be at least 150 pages long (unless they are graphic novels, see below) and may only be used for one task in this challenge, but cross-challenge posting is encouraged.

❖ Graphic novels must be at least 300 pages long, but two books can be combined to make up the page count as long as they both meet the same criteria.

❖ For each book you read, please post a link to the title and mention the author and the date you finished reading it. If a challenge task gives several options, make it clear which option you’ve chosen. If the task calls for an item/color on the cover, include a link to the book cover.* If it’s not obvious from the book title or cover, be sure to explain how your book fits the task. If you don’t, you won’t get credit for completing that task.

❖ If you want the challenge moderator to verify those books as you post them, please copy/paste your update into a new message. If you do this while you still have the Edit window open, it will copy all of your formatting, etc. too. It will make it easier on the moderators if we won’t have to scroll back through the entire thread looking for “message #15,” or to follow links back to an original post.

❖ When you complete the challenge, please post your entire list as a new message to make it easier for everyone to see what you’ve read 🙂 If you don’t repost your list, your name will not be added to the list of those who have completed the challenge.

❖ Rereads are allowed, as long as you read the entire book and not just skim the best portions! 🙂

* If you don’t know how to post a link to the book title, cover or author, see the instructions HERE.

1. Antarctica is cold (and water is wet). The coldest temperature ever recorded on Earth was minus 128.56 degrees Fahrenheit, registered on July 21, 1983, at Antarctica’s Vostok station. Unfortunately, it also recorded a new all-time high (for Antarctica), this year, when temperatures reached 69.35 degrees Fahrenheit.
🐧 Read a book which has the word COLD in its title (compound words are okay).

2. Antarctica is a desert. There is little to no precipitation in Antarctica. The Dry Valleys are the driest place on Earth, with low humidity and almost no snow or ice cover. They occupy about 1% of the continent and they are thought to be the world’s harshest deserts. It is estimated that these areas haven’t seen rain or snow in almost 2 million years. According to one study led by Australian scientists, due to climate change, ice-free areas in Antarctica could expand up to 25% by the end of 21st century. This could drastically change the biodiversity of the continent.
🐧 Read a book that has a landscape without water on the cover (post the cover).

3. Antarctica is windy. Antarctica is one of the windiest places on Earth and is home to unusual katabatic and downslope winds (katabatic wind is a wind that carries high-density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity). The strong winds are influenced by cold temperatures and the shape of the continent. The highest recorded wind speed was 200 miles per hour, at a French base back in 1972. Even though it doesn’t snow often in Antarctica, the winds can pick up the snow on the ground and create whiteout conditions.
🐧 Read a book whose cover is almost completely white (post the cover).

4. Antarctica has a ton of ice, and so, a lot of water. The Antarctic Ice Sheet is the largest single mass of ice on Earth. 99% of Antarctica is covered by ice. It is home to about 70% of the planet’s fresh water, and 90% of the planet’s freshwater ice. Unfortunately, this means that if the West Antarctic Ice Sheet melted, it would raise global sea levels by 16 feet.
🐧 Read a book that is mostly set in a coastal town/city (tell us where the book is set).

5. Antarctica has several lakes hidden under ice. Lake Vostok is a pristine freshwater lake buried beneath 2.5 miles of solid ice. It is about the size of Lake Ontario, and is the largest of more than 200 liquid lakes strewn around the continent under the ice. These lakes are absolutely teeming with microscopic life. Scientists can use water samples to learn about how these minuscule creatures survive in such a harsh environment. This could even give researchers an idea for how life might survive on other planets, such as below the ice found on Mars.
🐧 Read a non fiction book that teaches you something (it doesn’t necessarily have to be science, even language or history is okay as long as it is informative. Tell us what you learned).

6. It has a creepy waterfall called “Blood Falls”. Five million years ago, as sea levels rose, East Antarctica was flooded and a brine lake was formed there. After millions of years, glaciers formed on top of the lake. As they froze, the water below became even saltier. Today, the subglacial lake under Blood Falls is three times saltier than seawater and, therefore, is too salty to freeze. The water beneath Taylor Glacier, which feeds the Blood Fall, contains a lot of iron (picked up from the underlying bedrock) and when iron-rich water comes in contact with air, the iron oxidizes and takes on a red coloring, leaving blood-like stains on the ice.
🐧 Read a book with blood on the cover (post the cover).

7. It also has a rift the size of the Grand Canyon. A rift that could rival the Grand Canyon was discovered beneath the Antarctic ice during an expedition conducted during 2009-2010. It is roughly 6 miles across and at least 62 miles long, possibly far longer if it extends into the sea. It extends nearly a mile down at its deepest.
🐧 Read a book first published in 2009 or 2010 (tell us when).

8. There are mountains above and below the surface. Antarctica’s Gamburtsev Mountains are a range of steep peaks that rise to 9,000 feet and stretch 750 miles across the interior of the continent and are completely buried under 15,750 feet ice. Above the surface, the Transantarctic Mountains divide the continent into East and West sections. At 2,175 miles long, this range is one of the longest mountain ranges on Earth. The highest point on Antarctica is the Vinson Massif at 16,362 feet.
🐧 Read a book that is divided in two in some way (it could be divided into two timelines, two narrators, two parts and so on. Tell us how your book fits). – Born Free by Joy Adamson (divided into three parts)

9. It has two active volcanoes. There are plenty of extinct volcanoes in Antarctica, but there are two active ones as well. One of these is at Deception Island, and is an incredibly interesting and rare type of volcano. Located far beneath Antarctica’s ice, it has subglacial eruptions, which means that all of Deception’s activity happens below the surface of the ice. Antarctica’s other active volcano is Mount Erebus. It is the southernmost active volcano in the world and is home to the only known ‘lava lakes’, which have held liquid magma for eons despite the continent’s frigid conditions.
🐧 Read a book whose author’s first and last initial is in the word EREBUS (ignore middle initials, if any).

10. Antarctica was once a tropical continent and it can become one again due to greenhouse gases. Antarctica was once a green, tropical paradise with furry mammals like possums and beavers. Scientists say that it is only in the quite recent geological past it got so cold there. Around 52 million years ago, the concentration of carbon dioxide was more than twice as high compared to today and the climate was much hotter. However, according to scientists, if the current carbon dioxide emissions continue to rise due to burning of fossil fuels, we might hit the levels of 52 million years ago within a few hundred years.
🐧 Read a book with a furred animal in the story (let us know what kind).

11. The entire continent is dedicated for research. The Antarctic Treaty was signed on December 1, 1959, after more than a year of secret negotiations by 12 countries. It dedicates the continent to peaceful research activities. 48 nations have now signed the treaty. 29 countries operate 70 research stations on the continent. The researchers who occupy these facilities number around 4,000 during the summer months and only around 1,000 during the long, harsh winters.
🐧 Read a book in which a document of some sort is signed (tell us what). – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn

12. It has no official Time Zone. As Antarctica is mostly uninhabited, the continent is not officially divided into time zones. However, a number of existing research stations use either the time zone of the country that operates or supplies them, or use the local time of countries located nearby. For example, McMurdo Station observes New Zealand Standard & Daylight Time (NZDT &NZST). Palmer Station keeps Chile Summer Time (CLST) as Chile is the closest country to their station.
🐧 Read a book that has a time related word in the title. (For the purpose of this challenge, choose from these: Time, Second, Minute, Hour, Day, Night, Afternoon/Noon, Evening, Week, Month, Year. Compound words are okay).

13. Glaciology is the scientific study of glaciers. Glaciologists study glaciers, usually by extracting tubes of ice (called ice cores). Like year-rings on trees, ice cores can be used to trace the glacial history and therefore, the planet and its climate.
🐧 Read a book in which the main character has a profession that fascinates you (tell us which profession).

14. You are not allowed to work in Antarctica unless you have your wisdom teeth and appendix have been removed, whether they have anything wrong with them or not. This is because surgeries are not performed at any of the research stations on the continent.
🐧 Read a book in which a surgery is performed.

15. Babies have been born in Antarctica. In January 1979, Emile Marco Palma became the first child born on the southernmost continent. Argentina sent Palma’s pregnant mother to Antarctica in an effort to settle a sovereignty dispute. The child was born in the claimed Argentine Antarctica. This is a sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina as part of its national territory, but is not internationally recognized (and is in dispute with Britain and Chile). Ten people have been born in Antarctica since, but Palma’s is still the southernmost birth.
🐧 Read a book set in South America (bonus for Argentina. Tell us where it’s set).

16. Antarctica has the midnight sun phenomenon just like the Arctic circle. South of the Antarctic circle, there is a period of months when the sun never sets. Summers near the south pole are perpetually bright. Researchers who stay all year round also experience the opposite – permanent Antarctic darkness. However, tourists can only see this astronomical event in the Arctic circle, as Antarctica’s tourist season ends after summer.
🐧 Use a book that kept you reading at night. – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

17. There are no reptiles in Antarctica, but there are penguins! Penguins are the most common birds in the Antarctic. They live in colonies and survive in the harshest conditions. Out of the seventeen existing different species of penguins, two of them are permanent residents on Antarctica – the emperor and Adélie penguins. Others, like the macaroni, gentoo and chinstrap, breed on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, where the conditions are not that harsh. King penguins only breed on the warmer northern islands.
🐧 Read a book with an object that is both black and white on the cover (if the whole cover is only black and white, that works also. Post the cover).

18. Roald Amundsen was the first person to reach the South Pole. It took him and his team two tries to achieve this feat. The first attempt, started on September 8, 1911, had to be abandoned due to extreme temperatures. The second attempt consisted of Amundsen and a team of four others. They departed base on October 19, using four sledges and 52 dogs. Using a route along the previously unknown Axel Heiberg Glacier, they arrived at the edge of the Polar Plateau on November 21, after a four-day climb. The team and 16 dogs arrived at the pole proper on December 14, 1911. Amundsen named their South Pole camp Polheim and renamed the Antarctic Plateau as King Haakon VII’s Plateau.
🐧 Read a book whose title has been renamed for whatever reason. Tell us both titles.

19. But reaching the South Pole was a race and the losing party lost everything. Robert Falcon Scott was planning a South Pole expedition himself and wanted to beat Amundsen, but that was not to be. The Scott Expedition reached the South Pole on 17th January 1912, five weeks after Amundsen’s group. On their return journey, they battled poor weather, poorer health and troubling lack of supplies along their route. One by one, they succumbed to frostbite and starvation, until Scott and two remaining team members made their final camp just 12.5 miles short of their main supply depot. But blizzard conditions made further travel impossible, and as their supplies ran out and the storms didn’t abate, all three died. Scott was the last surviving member of the group, and he might have died on March 29, 1912. Their bodies were found in November of the year.
🐧 Read a book in which a tragedy occurs (using spoiler quotes if needed, tell us what it is).

20. Non-native species are not allowed on Antarctica. Sled dogs were used to haul supplies for the Norwegian explorers and they were kept and used in Antarctica for years. But in 1994, they (along with other non-native species) were banned due to fear that they might transmit canine distemper to the Antarctic seals or would escape and disturb the local wildlife.
🐧 Read a book with a canine (the animal, not the teeth) on the cover (post the cover).

21. Meteorites are everywhere! The continent has earned a reputation for being perfect for finding fallen space rocks. It’s not that it attracts falling meteorites more than any other place in the world. There’s an equal probability of meteorites landing anywhere. But there are two main characteristics that make Antarctica so great for meteorite enthusiasts: the white expanse and the ice drifts. The monochromatic landscape makes the dark rocks stand out, and the ice drifts tend to drop them all off in the same area. The freezing temperatures and extreme aridity also keep the meteorites more or less intact.
🐧 Read a book set in space.

22. The Circumpolar Current circles around Antarctica. It flows clockwise (as seen from the South Pole) from west to east around Antarctica. An alternative name for the Circumpolar Current is the West Wind Drift. It is the largest ocean current and is circumpolar due to the lack of any landmass connecting with Antarctica. This keeps warm ocean waters away from Antarctica, enabling it to maintain its huge ice sheet. Associated with the current is the Antarctic Convergence, where the cold Antarctic waters meet the warmer waters of the sub-Antarctic, creating a zone of upwelling nutrients. These nurture a huge food chain that support fish, whales, seals, albatrosses and many other species.
🐧 Read a book that has a donut/ring shape on the cover (post the cover).

23. There is a point called the Southern Pole of Inaccessibility. It is the point on Antarctica most distant from the Southern Ocean. A variety of coordinate locations have been given for this pole. The discrepancies are due to the question of whether the “coast” is measured to the grounding line or to the edges of ice shelves, the difficulty of determining the location of the “solid” coastline, the movement of ice sheets and improvements in the accuracy of survey data over the years, as well as possible topographical errors. It is far more remote and difficult to reach than the geographic South Pole. There is a Soviet Station in the general vicinity (called the Pole of Inaccessibility Station), and that location is what is commonly referred to whenever a fixed point is needed for a sport expedition.
🐧 Use a book that feels inaccessible for any reason (for example, there are a few books that make me feel very dim, because they’re too clever, too dense or written in not easily understandable way. Tell us why your book felt inaccessible).

24. Antarctica hosts marathons. Each November/December, runners gather at Union Glacier for the Antarctic Ice Marathon and Half Marathon. Runners endure strong winds and cold temperatures to compete in this race, which is the southernmost marathon on Earth. To prepare for the extreme conditions, some runners exercise on treadmills in walk-in freezers or run on sand. An even more extreme challenge is the Antarctic 100k, held in January.
🐧 Read the last book from a long running series (>15 published books. If the series isn’t complete, read the last published book. Tell us the series and the position of your book).

25. The hole in the ozone layer first formed over Antarctica. The term ozone hole refers to the large springtime decrease in stratospheric ozone around Earth’s polar regions. This “hole” in the ozone layer grows and shrinks with the seasons and is largely caused by chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons, once widely used in air conditioners, aerosol sprays and refrigerators, reacting with ozone in the polar stratospheric clouds. The hole has wide negative consequences, such as increased cancer risks.
🐧 Read a book with a main character whose name (first or last) begins with an O (tell us the name).

26. We cannot talk about Antarctica without talking about climate change. In the past 25 years Antarctica has lost more than 3 trillion tons of ice. Sadly, the ice loss process has accelerated dramatically over the last few years. While analyzing data from multiple satellite surveys from 1992 to 2017, a group of 84 international researchers has found that Antarctica is currently losing ice about three times faster than it did before 2012. In fact, Antarctica has lost so much ice so quickly, it has caused a shift in the Earth’s gravitational pull.
🐧 Read a book set on apocalyptic or post-apocalyptic Earth (bonus for climate change end times).

Reading Women Challenge 2021

Duration: 1st January – 31st December 2021
Number of books: 28
Hosted by: Reading Women Podcast

All books read for this challenge must be by women or people of other historically marginalized genders who are comfortable being included in feminine-coded initiatives.

  1. A Book Longlisted for the JCB Prize
    • The JCB Prize for Literature is an award presented each year to a distinguished work of fiction by an Indian author.
    • The prize aims to celebrate Indian writing and to help readers across the world discover the very best of contemporary Indian literature. It also makes significant awards also to translators, without whose work no reader can appreciate the scale and diversity of a literature written in over twenty languages.
    • Find out more over on the prize’s website.
  2. An Author from Eastern Europe
    • Eastern Europe is, as the name says, the eastern part of Europe. According to the United Nations Statistics Division, countries within Eastern Europe are Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the most-western part of the Russian Federation.
  3. A Book About Incarceration
    • Read a fiction or nonfiction book about any kind of incarceration set anywhere around the world.
  4. A Cookbook by a Woman of Color
    • You do not have to read every word of the cookbook.
    • Making a recipe from the cookbook is encouraged but not required.
    • If you are triggered by food, please feel free to read a book about cocktails, tea, coffee, olive oil, cocoa beans, or anything else food adjacent.
  5. A Book with a Protagonist Older than 50
    • Bonus points if the author is also over 50!
  6. A Book by a South American Author in Translation
    • As with all of our translation prompts, you can read in any language you like as long as the book has been translated from one language to another.
  7. Reread a Favorite Book
  8. A Memoir by an Indigenous, First Nations, Native, or Aboriginal Woman
  9. A Book by a Neurodivergent Author – The Bride Test by Helen Hoang
  10. A Crime Novel or Thriller in Translation
    • As with all of our translation prompts, you can read in any language you like as long as the book has been translated from one language to another.
  11. A Book About the Natural World – Born Free by Joy Adamson
  12. A Young Adult Novel by a Latinx Author
  13. A Poetry Collection by a Black Woman
  14. A Book with a Biracial Protagonist
  15. A Muslim Middle Grade Novel
  16. A Book Featuring a Queer Love Story
  17. About a Woman in Politics
    • Bonus points for reading about a woman in politics from a country that’s not your own!
  18. A Book with a Rural Setting
  19. A Book with a Cover Designed by a Woman
  20. A Book by an Arab Author in Translation
    • As with all of our translation prompts, you can read in any language you like as long as the book has been translated from one language to another.
    • The Arab World consists of twenty-two countries in the Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, the Comoros Islands, Djibouti, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Mauritania, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.
  21. A Book by a Trans Author
    • This includes trans women and nonbinary trans authors comfortable being included in feminine-coded initiatives.
  22. A Fantasy Novel by an Asian Author
  23. A Nonfiction Book Focused on Social Justice
  24. A Short Story Collection by a Caribbean Author

BONUS

  • A Book by Alexis Wright
  • A Book by Tsitsi Dangarembga
  • A Book by Leila Aboulela
  • A Book by Yoko Ogawa

Around the Year in 52 Books 2021

Duration: 1st January – 31st December 2021
Number of books: 52
Hosted by: Around the Year

Welcome!

It’s best if you create your own plan (using “create a new topic” and choosing “2021 Plans” for the folder) so you can keep track of your progress and share your choices with the other members. If you need help finding ideas, you can have a look at the weekly topics, which will be posted shortly.

You can read in order or jump around, but keep this order in your plan, since this makes it easier for others to find a prompt and gain inspiration.

If you can’t complete the challenge, it’s not a problem. If one topic is too far out of your comfort zone or too difficult to fulfill, you can use a “Wild Card” and read something else for this week (reader’s choice or past suggestions).

This listed is loosely sorted by months.

THE 2021 LIST
1. A book related to “In the Beginning…” – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy
2. A book by an author whose name doesn’t contain the letters A, T or Y – Beautiful Beast by E.J. Hill
3. A book related to the lyrics for the song “My Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music – Born Free by Joy Adamson (kittens)
4. A book with a monochromatic cover

5. A book by an author on USA Today’s list of 100 Black Novelists You Should Read
6. A love story
7. A book that fits a prompt suggestion that didn’t make the final list
8. A book set in a state, province, or country you have never visited

9. A book you associate with a specific season or time of year
10. A book with a female villain or criminal
11. A book to celebrate The Grand Egyptian Museum
12. A book eligible for the Warwick Prize for Women in Translation
13. A book written by an author of one of your best reads of 2020

14. A book set in a made-up place
15. A book that features siblings as the main characters
16. A book with a building in the title
17. A book with a Muslim character or author

18. 3 books related to “Past, Present, Future” – Book 1
19. 3 books related to “Past, Present, Future” – Book 2
20. 3 books related to “Past, Present, Future” – Book 3
21. A book whose title and author both contain the letter “u”
22. A book posted in one of the ATY Best Book of the Month threads

23. A cross genre novel
24. A book about racism or race relations
25. A book set on an island
26. A short book (<210 pages) by a new-to-you author

27. A book with a character who can be found in a deck of cards
28. A book connected to ice
29. A book that you consider comfort reading
30. A long book

31. A book by an author whose career spanned more than 21 years
32. A book whose cover shows more than 2 people
33. A collection of short stories, essays, or poetry
34. A book with a travel theme
35. A book set in a country on or below the Tropic of Cancer

36. A book with six or more words in the title
37. A book from the Are You Well Read in World Literature list
38. A book related to a word given by a random word generator
39. A book involving an immigrant

40. A book with flowers or greenery on the cover
41. A book by a new-to-you BIPOC author
42. A mystery or thriller
43. A book with elements of magic

44. A book whose title contains a negative
45. A book related to a codeword from the NATO Phonetic Alphabet
46. A winner or nominee from the 2020 Goodreads Choice Awards
47. A non-fiction book other than biography, autobiography or memoir
48. A book that might cause someone to react “You read what?!?”

49. A book with an ensemble cast
50. A book published in 2021
51. A book whose title refers to person(s) without giving their name
52. A book related to “the end”

This list is created by the group members, after suggestions and votes.

Happy New Year

Duration: 1st January – 31st January 2021
Number of books: 6
Hosted by: My Vampire Book Obsession

description
Happy New Year

Duration
January 1st – 31st

Rules
Complete at least two tasks to get the vampire heart
All genres welcome
Rereads welcome
No minimum page count

description

1. Start the year out right! Read any book you want. – Kiss of Heat by Lora Leigh
2. Read a brand new shiny book – Rolling with the Punchlines by Urzila Carlson
3. Read that book you meant to read last year – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn
4. Read a book by a new to you author – Beautiful Beast by E.J. Hill
5. Read a book released this month
6. Read book 1 in a series – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

Pick Your Poison

Duration: 1st January – 31st December 2021
Number of books: 104
Hosted by: Gregory Road

Baker’s Dozen  |  13 books
Choose one category from any 13 of the topics provided except for the wildcard books
Fortnightly  |  26 books
One category from each topic–you can choose one wildcard
52 Pickup  |  52 books
Two categories from each topic–you can choose one wildcard
Goin’ for the Burn  |  78 books
Three categories from each topic–you can choose two wildcards
Freaky Reader  |  104 books
Two books a week–must complete all the topics–you can choose two wildcards


Who’s in charge?
A book about an empire
A book about a social movement
A book about being a first time parent
A book about a cat – Born Free by Joy Adamson

Make ’em Laugh
A funny comic or graphic novel
A book about a comedian
A book with a pun in the title
A book with someone laughing on the cover

Where You Sleep At Night
A book about a hotel
A book with the word “house” in the title
A book with a cabin on the cover
A book about a haunted house

Ways To Die
A book with “poison” in the title
A book with a knife on the cover
A true crime murder story
A book about dealing with suicide

Occupations
A book about a farmer
A book about a librarian or bookseller
A book written by a college professor
A book about a scientist

Generations
A book about millenials
A book about hippies
A book about baby boomers
A book about flappers

Plaids
A book with a kilt on the cover
A book written by someone from Scotland
A book with a plaid cover
A book with a flannel shirt on the cover

Those Bodies
A book by a celebrity known for body positivity – Rolling with the Punchlines by Urzila Carlson
A book with a picture of an ocean on the cover – The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband by Julia Quinn
A book with a dead body on the cover
A children’s book about body parts

The Tools of Writing
A paperback book – Kiss of Heat by Lora Leigh
A book with a typewriter on the cover
A book with “words” in the title
A book with “deadline” in the title

That Creepy Feeling
A horror story or thriller
A book with an insect on the cover
A book about something that scares you
A book with a monster on the cover

Favorites
A book by your favorite author
A book in your favorite genre
A book with your favorite color on the cover
A book from a celebrity favorite list

Crossing Boundaries
A book about an interracial romance
A book about the immigrant experience – The Bride Test by Helen Hoang
A book about reconciliation
A book about cross dressing

Bringing the World into Your Home
A book about hygge, feng shui, or home harmony
A book about taking in a stranger
A book about a culture other than your own
A book about how radio, television, or the internet has changed us

Things We Don’t Talk About
A book with the word “naked” in the title
A book by a politician
A book about oppression
A book about terminal illness

Reflections
A book with a mirror on the cover
A memoir
A fiction book about reminiscing
A self help book

Swashbuckling
A book with a sword on the cover
A book about pirates
A rollicking adventure story
A book with a map on the cover

Shapes and Colors
A book with a primarily black cover
A book with a shape-shifting character
A book with a shape on the cover that reminds you of a Roschach test
A book by an author whose name is a color

Picture This
A book with the word “picture” in the title
A book with a photograph on the cover
A book by a journalist or news photographer
An illustrated book

Shh…
A book about secret societies/clubs
A children’s book about bedtime
A book with the word “secret” in the title
A book with a peaceful cover

Challenges
A book over 500 pages
A book about overcoming obstacles
A book you’ve set aside in the past because it was hard to get into
A book with the word “hard” in the title

Drinking Game
A cozy mystery with a beverage in the title
A book with a picture of an alcoholic beverage on the cover
A book title that could be a drinking game
A nonfiction book about alcohol

It’s All Relative
A book set in your grandparents’ era
A book with the word “father” in the title
A book you’d share with your child – Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy
A book about an estranged family

Weather
A book with the word “snow” in the title
A nonfiction book about a weather related disaster
A book with a picture of clear blue sky on the cover
A book that comforts you on a rainy day

TBR Burners
A book that had been on your TBR list more than a year
A book someone gave to you that you haven’t read yet
Anything you want
A book you’re excited to read – Beautiful Beast by E.J. Hill

Borrowing
A book with a character from a different book
A fairytale or myth retelling in a modern setting
A book written by an author with a pseudonym
A book borrowed from the library

Putting 2020 Behind Us
A book with a crowded cover
A book about self care or recovery
A book set after a major world event (war, weather disaster, etc.)
A book with the word “better” in the title

+++ Wildcards +++
A book by an author under 30
A 2021 release
A comic book
A book by two or more authors
A collection of essays